Institute for Jewish History in Austria, Austria

The Institute for Jewish History in Austria was founded in 1988 and is housed in the former synagogue of St. Pölten 60 kilometers west of Vienna. Its task is to carry out comprehensive research into the history and culture of the Jews in Austria, from the Middle Ages up to the present day. It is its’ aim to counteract anti- and philo-Semitic prejudices and incorrect information through academic research, publications, lectures and activities in the area of adult education and school projects. The location of the Institute in the former synagogue in St. Poelten gave a new and meaningful use to this abandoned building.

Strasshof an der Nordbahn, Austria

During the National Socialist era, the Strasshof transit camp was one of the central transit camps for foreign forced laborers from all over Europe. Tens of thousands of people were brought here, some under duress, others under false pretenses, and allocated to the most diverse workplaces throughout eastern Austria. Hundreds died here. In 1944, more than 20,000 Jewish men, women, and children from Hungary were also deported to Strasshof for forced labor. In particular, older people and children thus escaped certain death in Auschwitz and survived the Holocaust. In Strasshof itself, the history of the camp fell into oblivion after the end of the war. Citizens of Strasshof set out to search for traces of this National Socialist crime in their town and erected a memorial for the victims so that the injustice inflicted on them would never be forgotten. Work on this project began in 2009. Contemporary witnesses were interviewed, historical sources consulted, and material collected. In 2011, the memorial designed by Karl Heinz Schreiner was erected near the transit camp on behalf the VAS. For the exhibition 90 Years Strasshof (2014), a separate section on the history of the transit camp was created in cooperation with the Strasshof Museum of Local History. Since 2013, an annual commemoration ceremony has been held at the memorial.

Montreal Holocaust Museum, Canada

The Montreal Holocaust Museum educates people of all ages and backgrounds about the Holocaust, while sensitising the public to the universal perils of antisemitism, racism, hate and indifference. Through its Museum, its commemorative programs and educational initiatives, the Montreal Holocaust Museum promotes respect for diversity and the sanctity of human life. https://museeholocauste.ca/en/

Blue House in Breisach, Germany

For 140 years, the Blue House was an inn in the middle of the Jewish quarter, then a schoolhouse for the Jewish community, and later the community center and residence of the cantor’s family. An exhibition in the former living quarters of the family of Michael Eisemann allows visitors to experience the life of the family and the community in 1931. Guests can also visit the prayer room, which was installed in early 1939 and served as a meeting place for the congregation before the community was decimated by deportation to the Gurs internment camp in France. The Society for the Promotion of the Former Jewish Community Center in Breisach supports especially artistic projects in an effort to breathe new life into the former community center and the Jewish quarter.

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki, Greece

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki was founded to honour the rich and creative Sephardic heritage as it evolved in the city after the 15th century. Through several exhibits and photos, the visitor receives information on the religious and everyday life of the Jews of Thessaloniki up to WWII. It is laid out on two levels and comprises a display of tombstones from the ancient Jewish cemetery of Thessaloniki, a photographic exhibit “Thessaloniki, Sephardic Metropolis”, an ethnographic part with religious artefacts and memorabilia, a part dedicated to the Holocaust in Thessaloniki. http://www.jmth.gr/

Dana Arieli's Phantoms Project, Israel

The Israeli Dana Arieli has for years been photographing places where National Socialist ideology is still visible or concealed. Internationally renowned poets, authors, politicians, texts and statements accompany her photographs. Visitors are also invited to write texts about the photographs, to become part of the project with their own opinions and thoughts. Dana Arieli on the project "The Nazi Phantom": "The still existing Nazi architecture, or rather the sites of the perpetrators, are often still neglected in public dealings. This reflects the difficulties in the country of the perpetrators in dealing with the personification of the Nazi era. German cities have chosen different strategies for dealing with the issue: the first aims to demolish the buildings; the second confronts the history and preservation of architecture; the third redefines the role of the buildings and, through these mechanisms, expands their significance. Transparent remembrance is another solution that is discussed here.” Dana Arieli worked from 2013 to 2018 as Dean of Design at H.I.T., Institute of Technology in Holon and from 2004 to 2012 as Head of the History and Theory Department at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. https://phantoms.photography

Holocaust Fund of the Jews from Macedonia, Macedonia

The Holocaust Memorial center for the Jews of Macedonia is an institution for the documentation, study and interpretation of Holocaust history, and serves as Macedonia's memorial to the people murdered during the Holocaust in the concentration camp Treblinka. The Museum's primary mission is to advance and disseminate knowledge about this unprecedented tragedy; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage its visitors to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as citizens of a democracy. https://holocaustfund.org.mk/en

MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków

A ten-minute stroll away from Kraków’s historical district of Kazimierz, MOCAK is located on the premises of the former Oskar Schindler enamel factory and is now the heart of the post-industrial district of Zabłocie. MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków brings you the most important phenomena in Polish and international art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, several large temporary exhibitions a year, and an international collection of contemporary art, as well as research and publications that comprise some ten titles annually. The museum’s modern building houses numerous exhibitions devoted to contemporary Polish and world art. In addition, MOCAK offers a library with a reading room, the Mieczysław Porębski Library, and the MOCAK Bookstore, where you will find a selection of the most interesting contemporary humanities publications, as well as reproductions of selected works from the MOCAK collection and objects designed by artists represented in the museum. MOCAK is an important site on the cultural map of the city. Each year, the museum organizes dozens of film screenings, discussions, and meetings with personalities from the world of culture and art, as well as concerts, workshops, and social actions. https://en.mocak.pl/

Elie Wiesel Museum – Jewish Culture Museum from Maramureş, Romania

The late Jewish writer and 1986 Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel (1928–2016) was born in and later deported from this house on the corner of Str Dragoş Vodă and Str Tudor Vladimirescu. The museum traces Wiesel's life and work and examines the history of the Jews and Jewish culture in Maramureş. http://muzeulmaramuresului.ro/descopera/casa-memoriala-elie-wiesel/

Elie Wiesel National Institute, Romania

The Elie Wiesel National Institute for Studying the Holocaust in Romania, Institutul Naţional pentru Studierea Holocaustului din România „Elie Wiesel”, is a public institution established by the Romanian government on August 7, 2005, and officially opened on October 9 of the same year, which is Romania's National Day of Commemorating the Holocaust. The institute is named after the Romanian-born Jewish Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel, who chaired the Wiesel Commission which reported on Romania's involvement in the Holocaust to the Romanian government in 2004, and which recommended that such an institute be established. The institute is responsible for researching Romania's role in the Holocaust, and gathering, archiving and publishing documents relating to this event. http://www.inshr-ew.ro/

Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery, Russia

The memorial complex designed by Alexander Vasiliev and Yevgeniy Levinson was opened on May 9, 1960. About 420,000 civilians and 50,000 soldiers of the Leningrad Front were buried in 186 mass graves. Near the entrance an eternal flame is located. A marble plate affirms that from September 4, 1941 to January 22, 1944 107,158 air bombs were dropped on the city, 148,478 shells were fired, 16,744 men died, 33,782 were wounded and 641,803 died of starvation. The center of the architectural composition is the bronze monument symbolizing the Mother Motherland, by sculptors Vera Isaeva and Robert Taurit. By granite steps leading down from the eternal flame visitors enter the main 480-meter path which leads to the Motherland monument. http://www.pmemorial.ru/

Boris Lurie Art Foundation, USA

The Boris Lurie Art Foundation is dedicated to reflect the life, work, and as-pirations of the founder and to preserve and promote the NO!art movement with its focus on the social visionary in art and culture. Boris Lurie, A Holocaust survivor who emigrated to New York in 1946, was very active in the post-war New York avant-garde scene, founding the NO!art movement in 1959. The NO!Art movement calls for socially and polit-ically involved art that resists and combats the repressive forces of the market. For the most part, critics and curators of the day rejected Lurie and NO!art, yet Lurie continued to produce his highly charged political and social imagery throughout his life. In recent years a reexamining of Lurie’s work has led to major museum exhibitions and new appreciation for the impact his work had on Post-War American Art. https://borislurieart.org/

Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, USA

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life was established in 2010 following the transfer of the Judah L. Magnes Museum to the University of California, Berkeley. Its remarkably diverse archive, library and museum holdings include art, objects, texts, music, and historical documents about the Jews in the Global Diaspora and the American West. As one of the world's preeminent Jewish collections in a university setting, it provides highly innovative and accessible resources to both researchers and the general public. The holdings of The Magnes continue to grow. In 2017, The Magnes established the Taube Family Arthur Szyk Collection, and in 2018 it received the gift of the Roman Vishniac Archive.

Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre, South Africa

The Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre (JHGC) is a place of memory, education and lessons for humanity. It explores the history of genocide in the 20th century with a focus on the case studies of the Holocaust and the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. It examines the connections between genocide and contemporary human rights issues, urging visitors to understand the consequences of prejudice, discrimination and othering, so as to prevent the recurrence of mass atrocities and genocide in all its forms. The Centre focuses on human rights issues such as prejudice, racism, ‘othering’, antisemitism, homophobia and xenophobia. Conscious of the dangers of indifference, apathy and silence, the JHGC urges its visitors to be an active voice against instances of hate speech and related human rights violations in their own communities. The JHGC was founded in 2008 and officially opened to the public in March 2019 as a public-private partnership with the City of Johannesburg. The JHGC, together with its sister Centres in Cape Town and Durban, forms part of the association, the South African Holocaust & Genocide Foundation.

Institute for Jewish History in Austria, Austria

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Mai 03, 2015

A commemorative stone for 228 Hungarian Jewish massacre victims

Elisheva Yair and Yakov Schwarcz

Elisheva, Yair, und Yakov Schwarcz in front of the commemorative stone, Mai 3, 2015 © photo: Wolfgang Mayer, Magistrate, Sankt Pölten

In the night from May 2 to 3, 1945, just five days before the end of the war, members of the Waffen-SS shot 228 Jewish men, women, and children who had been deported from Hungary to Austria for forced labor in the spring of 1944. As of mid-April, they were interned in a transit camp in Hofamt Priel near Ybbs Persenbeug (Lower Austria). The eleven-year-old Tibor Yacov Schwarcz was able to hide under a straw mattress and survive; his mother Ilona and his sisters Éva and Judith were murdered. To this day, it has not been possible to determine the perpetrators. The bodies were initially buried not far from the scene of the crime and only transferred to the Jewish cemetery in Sankt Pölten on April 26, 1964. Only a small memorial stone without names bore witness of their fate.
Exactly seventy years after the crime and after years of research, the Institute for Jewish History in Austria (Injoest) finally installed a commemorative stone forthe victims. Yacov Schwarcz came with his wife Elisheva, his four children, and three of his sixteen grandchildren to inaugurate the stone. Roughly 120 people, from politicians to students, attended to pay their respects to the victims, to read their names aloud, and to pray the Kaddish. After the ceremony, Yacov Schwarcz’s son Roni expressed great hope: In all this evil there is Tikkun Olam, the possibility of “Healing the World.”

Mass grave with memorial stone (1964) and commemorative stone (2015) © photo: Josef Vorlaufer, Magistrate, SanktPölten

Mass grave with memorial stone

Strasshof an der Nordbahn, Austria

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Oktober 02, 2011

Inauguration of the memorial for the victims of the Strasshof transit camp

Memorial

Memorial for the victims of the Strasshof transit camp

The memorial is a place of commemoration for the victims of the Strasshof transit camp. At the local cemetery alone, there are roughly 500 people buried who died in this camp. The taskforce Verein Arbeitsgruppe Strasshof (VAS) commissioned the artist Karl Heinz Schreiner to design the memorial, the seven columns of which symbolize the seven labor camps that were located in Strasshof. Since 2015, a part of the permanent exhibition in the Kulturhaus Strasshof also provides information about the history of forced labor in the town. The largest camp in Strasshof was the transit camp for foreign forced laborers, built in 1942 by the Labor Deployment Administration. Tens of thousands of people from all over Europe were deported here. In the summer of 1944, roughly 15,000 Jewish men, women, and children were deported from Hungary to Strasshof. According to an agreement between Eichmann and the Jewish Rescue Committee in Budapest, they were allowed to remain together as families and were exploited as civilian forced laborers in eastern Austria. The employers also had to take in those who were unfit for work. For Jewish children in particular, Strasshof therefore became a means of survival.

Since 2012, regular commemoration events have been held together with camp survivors and their descendants from Hungary. For the VAS, the most important thing is the encounter with these people, for example at the “Celebration of Survival” in 2015

Celebration of Survival

Montreal Holocaust Museum, Canada

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September 09, 1979

Establishment of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Center

Opening ceremony of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Center 1979

Opening ceremony of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Center - a procession led by survivors brings an urn containing ashes from Auschwitz to the museum. © Montreal Holocaust Memorial Center

Through their remarkable activism and remembrance efforts, Montreal survivors established the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Center on September 9, 1979. This organisation educates the public about the dangers of hatred, antisemitism, racism, and indifference. Between 1947 and 1955, over 35,000 Holocaust survivors settled in Canada, mostly in Montreal. As they rebuild their lives, they were compelled to remember those who were killed. Their first commemorative and activist endeavors began in the 1960s after they established the Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression. The Association held Holocaust remembrance rallies in Montreal and Ottawa and invited Canadians to learn more about their personal experiences. They fought neo-Nazism and fascism, which contributed to the amendment of the criminal code to ban hate speech. At the opening ceremony, a procession lead by survivors brought an urn with ashes from Auschwitz into the Museum. Since many survivors did not have graves to honor their loved ones, a memorial room was created. This space houses the urn and is dedicated to the victims of the Holocaust. Today, this institution, which is the first of its kind in Canada, holds the largest collection of Holocaust artifacts and testimonies in the country. In 2017, the organisation was renamed the Montreal Holocaust Museum. It still carries the survivors’ original mission of promoting respect for diversity and preserving the stories of individuals persecuted by the Nazis.

Blue House in Breisach, Germany

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Januar 01, 2003

Memorial and educational institution for the history of the Jews of Breisach and the Upper Rhine

the Blue House

Today, the Blue House is a memorial and educational institution for the history of the Jews of Breisach and the Upper Rhine

Today, the Blue House is a memorial and educational institution for the history of the Jews of Breisach and the Upper Rhine. After the acquisition and renovation of the former Jewish community center, the inauguration was celebrated with Holocaust survivors of the congregationand their descendants from all over the world. With the joint efforts of the promotional society, the city, the state, and the “Friends of the Blue House,” major financial hurdles were overcome. One goal is to gather information on all the Jewish families who lived in the Blue House in Breisach in 1933: a search for clues and documentation of the presence of families from this third Jewish community over a timespan of up to 300 years. For 140 years, the Blue House was an inn in the middle of the Jewish quarter, then a schoolhouse for the Jewish community, and later the community center and residence of the cantor’s family. An exhibition in the former living quarters of the family of Michael Eisemann allows visitors to experience the life of the family and the community in 1931. Guests can also visit the prayer room, which was installed in early 1939 and served as a meeting place for the congregation before the community was decimated by deportation to the Gurs internment camp in France.
The "Society for the Promotion of the Former Jewish Community Center in Breisach" supports especially artistic projects in an effort to breathe new life into the former community center and the Jewish quarter. Josef Kornweitz, for example, projected the photos of Jewish families onto the façades of their former houses. Aviva Geismar choreographed the piece Closer Than It Seems for the former Judengasse, where her family had lived since 1640, past the house where her grandparents grew up, who were later deported to Gurs.

The Society for the Promotion of the Former Jewish Community Center in Breisach supports especially artistic projects in an effort to breathe new life into the former community center and the Jewish quarter. © the Blue House

the Blue House

Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki, Greece

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März 15, 1943

The first train to Auschwitz

On the morning of March 15,1943, the residents of the Baron Hirsch neighbourhood in Thessaloniki, which was located by the railway station, were packed into livestock wagons, which were overloaded to twice their capacity. The cars were shut and sealed. The train departed for Poland with the first 2,800 deportees. After a tortuous, five-day journey, these Salonikan Jews reached Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. Immediately, 2,191 of them were forced to the gas chambers, gassed to death, and their bodies burnt in the industrial crematoriums. The rest, 417 men and 192 women were led to the labour camp to suffer an industrial, mass murder. After the departure of the first train, the residents of the adjacent Stasionika neighbourhood were forced to Baron Hirsch to be sent north under the same inhumane conditions as the first. From March through August 1943, nineteen train-loads of Jews left the city. The last two trains, in August 1943, transferred to Bergen-Belsen camp the Thessaloniki Jews who held Spanish passports, along with Jewish community administrators and Jews who had been used by, or cooperated with, the Germans. Out of 48,533 Thessaloniki Jews sent to the camps, 37,386 were sent to the gaschambers immediately (77%). Most of the rest were killed through forced manual labour, exhaustion and starvation. Within a few weeks, the largest centre of Sephardic Judaism in the world ceased to exist.

© The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

Jews in Thessaloniki

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Mai 13, 2001

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

Exterior view of the Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki, ©Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

Exterior view of the Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki was inaugurated on May 13th 2001. It was established by the local Jewish Community to keep the memory of the long Jewish presence in the city. Besides its permanent exhibition and the maintenance of its collections, the Museum organises temporary exhibitions, seminars for school teachers, and scholarly conferences. The Museum is housed in an old building, a property of the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki. It is one of the few buildings in the old city which survived the great fire of 1917. It was restored in the late 1990s and since 2001 three wings of it were successively given to the Museum (extensions: 2009 and 2019)

Jews in Thessaloniki

© Thessaloniki Jewish Museum

Dana Arieli's Phantoms Project, Israel

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September 01, 2020

'Phantoms: Journeys Following the Relics of Totalitarism' By Dana Arieli

Image from the Phantom Project Dana Arieli

© Dana Arieli, 2015 https://phantoms.photography

My work on the Phantoms Project started in 2009. At that point I was teaching history of the art in Bezalel (Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem) and my research dealt mainly with the interrelations between art and politics in Germany and Israel. During that year I was invited to a tour by the Goethe Institute and I also started to study photography so it seemed only natural for me to take photos during my journey to Germany. I had a very clear idea what are the places I wish to visit in Germany: All the locations I was hoping to visit were either active or deserted buildings that was used during the Nazi era. As I finished my first Journey (it took almost 30 days), I was not certain if I will continue with this project: dealing with the past as well as with the current memory culture proved to be very intense for me. There was a huge difference between writing as a historian detached from the events and “neutral” and photographing these places as an individual artist with a family history. Today, after 11 years went by and I have completed over 33 such journeys I can safely say that this is my lifetime project. During 2014 I have published my first book - The Nazi Phantom - Based on this project. Two years later I have launched an interactive site with a few hundred photos (out of the 50,000 or more I have collected as years went by). https://phantoms.photography

© Dana Arieli, 2009 https://phantoms.photography

Image from the Phantom Project Dana Arieli

Holocaust Fund of the Jews from Macedonia, Macedonia

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April 23, 2002

The Holocaust Memorial Center for the Jews from Macedonia

Image Monopol Commemoration on March 11 date of the deportation of the Macedonian Jews

Tobacco Factory was transformed as a transit camp in March of 1943 from where 7.144 Jews, which represented 98% of Macedonian Jewry at that time were deported to killing center Treblinka.

The Jewish roots in North Macedonia are ancient. One of the oldest known synagogues outside the Land of Israel is in the ancient city Stobi, dating back to the first century AD. This means that the Jews have been present in these territories since more than two millennia. The demographic structure of the Jews in the Balkans changed in the aftermath of the Inquisition and Expulsion from Spain and Portugal in the sixteenth century. Expelled Jews resettled and rebuild their shattered world in the Balkans, then part of the Ottoman Empire. Jews established a unique culture based on the Ladinolanguage, which knew no geographical borders; for centuries, Jews in the Balkans would speak to each other in the same language. All was lost, however, in the Holocaust. During WWII, today’s territory of Macedonia was under Bulgarian occupation. In March 1943, Macedonian Jews were rounded up, evicted from their homes, and sent to a tobacco factory in Skopje. From there, 7,144 Jews, presenting 98% of the Macedonian Jews at that time, were deported and killed in the Treblinka dead camp. The official commemoration began in March 1945 by Holocaust survivors. In 2011, the Holocaust Memorial Center for the Jews from Macedonia was inaugurated; and in 2019, the permanent exhibition was opened. The Holocaust Memorial Center is the only institution in Southeast Europe devoted exclusively to preserving the memory and history of the once great and thriving Sephardic Jewish Community that was almost annihilated during the Holocaust.

Image Memorial Center: Entrance of the Memorial Center. All the images in the frames are pictures of the Macedonian Jews that were deported to Treblinka.

Image Memorial Center

MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków

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Mai 19, 2011

The Idea of Creating the Museum

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow (MOCAK), work by Beat Streuli Krakow, October 2005, 2006, MOCAK Collection, photo: Rafał Sosin

The project of creating a museum of contemporary art in Kraków, which had been discussed for years both within the artistic community and the local government, finally became reality towards the end of 2004, when the Municipality of Kraków purchased the land and buildings on the site of the former Schindler factory at Lipowa Street 4, with the intention of providing a home for the future institution. The inauguration of the MOCAK building took place on November 16, 2010. On May 19, 2011 a formal opening of the museum took place, as well as the presentation of the first six exhibitions. Thousands of visitors came to MOCAK on that day, including the President of Poland, Bronisław Komorowski.

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Februar 01, 2010

The Program of MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków on World War II and the Holocaust

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow (MOCAK), work by Beat Streuli Krakow, October 2005, 2006, MOCAK Collection, photo: Rafał Sosin

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

The Holocaust is an important focus of MOCAK’s program. The museum’s location on the site of Oskar Schindler’s former enamel factory, as well as its closeness to the former Kraków ghetto and the concentration camp in Płaszów, together with its relative proximity to Auschwitz, mean that this is a place that has been powerfully marked by history. For this reason, MOCAK has consistently endeavored to bring this context into the public consciousness through its program of exhibitions, publications, and films and the presentation of relevant works from its collection. Our first book that took on the challenge of a contemporary approach to the problem of the Holocaust was Wilhelm Brasse, Number 3444: Photographer, Auschwitz 1940–1945, an account by an internee who was the chief photographer in the Auschwitz concentration camp. It was the first of our series of publications related to the Holocaust, all accompanied by a film recording of statements by survivors. The pivotal moment for our exhibition profile came with the international exhibition History in Art (curator: Maria Anna Potocka), which kicked off the museum’s activity (May 20–October 16, 2011) and featured the drama of World War II as a leitmotif.

In 2014, MOCAK embarked on a collaboration with the Center for Persecuted Arts in Solingen, which came to fruition with numerous joint projects. The first and most important of these was the exhibition Poland – Israel –Germany: The Experience of Auschwitz (curators: Delfina Jałowik and Jürgen Kaumkötter), presented in both institutions (Kraków: May 15–October 31, 2015; Solingen: December 9, 2015–January 24, 2016). The exhibition was accompanied by two MOCAK publications. The first, with the same title, described works by twenty-one participating contemporary artists, who employed varying approaches to perceiving Auschwitz as a site of the Holocaust from the perspective of the three nationalities. The second publication was a Polish edition of the book "Death Does Not Have the Last Word" by Jürgen Kaumkötter, the curator in Solingen, about artists who created works in ghettos and concentration camps during World War II.
The Polish edition of Michel Kichka’s graphic novel "Second Generation" was also inspired, albeit less directly, by the exhibition. The following presentations abroad organized in collaboration with MOCAK also referred to the Holocaust: Jonasz Stern’s Landscape after the Holocaust at the Center for Persecuted Arts in Solingen (curator: Maria Anna Potocka, August 5–September 25, 2016); Second Generation: Graphic Novelby Michel Kichka at the Kunstmuseum in Gelsenkirchen (curators: Delfina Jałowik, Jürgen Kaumkötter, January 30–April 2, 2017); as well as the exhibition dedicated to Zofia Posmysz, an Auschwitz prisoner and writer: Auschwitz and Literatureat the Musiktheater im Revier in Gelsenkirchen (curator: Maria Anna Potocka, January 27–April 2, 2017), Images of the Holocaust in Literature: “The Passenger” by Zofia Posmyszat the Center for Persecuted Arts in Solingen (curator: Magdalena Mazik, January 28–February 26, 2017) and The Passengerin the Semperoper in Dresden (curator: Maria Anna Potocka, April 18–July 9, 2017). MOCAK presented a unique exhibition titled Lagertheater about theater in PoW and concentration camps (curators: Magdalena Kulesza, Katarzyna Wodarska-Ogidel, October 20, 2017–January 28, 2018) and also the first exhibition in Poland dedicated to the US-American artist Boris Lurie: Pop-Art After the Holocaust (October 26, 2018–February 3, 2019). (Text: Delfina Jałowik)

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow (MOCAK), photo: Rafał Sosin

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Oktober 29, 2020

MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków

A ten-minute stroll away from Kraków’s historical district of Kazimierz, MOCAK is located on the premises of the former Oskar Schindler enamel factory and is now the heart of the post-industrial district of Zabłocie. MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Kraków brings you the most important phenomena in Polish and international art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, several large temporary exhibitions a year, and an international collection of contemporary art, as well as research and publications that comprise some ten titles annually. The museum’s modern building houses numerous exhibitions devoted to contemporary Polish and international art. In addition, MOCAK offers a library with a reading room, the Mieczysław Porębski Library, and the MOCAK Bookstore, where you will find a selection of the most interesting contemporary humanities publications, as well as reproductions of selected works from the MOCAK collection and objects designed by artists represented in the museum. MOCAK is an important site on the cultural map of the city. Each year, the museum organizes dozens of film screenings, discussions, and meetings with personalities from the world of culture and art, as well as concerts, workshops, and social actions.

Elie Wiesel Museum – Jewish Culture Museum from Maramureş, Romania

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Juli 29, 2002

The inauguration of the Elie Wiesel Museum.

Elie Wiesel Maramures

The Museum of Jewish Culture in Maramureș, Sighetu Marmației, Romania opened on July 29, 2002

The Museum was inaugurated in 2002 to honor the life and activity of Elie Wiesel, as well as the memory of more than 40,000 Jews who lived in the region before the Second World War. Elie Wiesel was born in Sighetu Marmațieion September 30, 1928. He was fifteen when he was deported with his family and the rest of the 38,000 Jews from Maramureș, of which only 2,300 returned. His mother and youngest sister died in Auschwitz. The other two sisters survived. Elie Wiesel and his father were later transported from Auschwitz to Buchenwald, where his father died just before the camp was liberated in April 1945. After the war, Elie Wiesel studied in Paris and became a journalist, also beginning a literary career with his first book "Night." He later emigrated to the United States, where he resided until his death in 2016. In 1980, he became the founding chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He was a constant supporter of the State of Israel, of the cause of soviet Jews, as well as of Nicaragua’s Miskito Indians, Cambodian refugees, the Kurdish people, victims of famine and genocide in Africa, and the war victims in former Yugoslavia, taking sides whenever human rights were ignored. He wrote 57 books, both fiction and non-fiction, and received over 140 awards including The Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

Exterior view of the Elie Wiesel Museum, Sighet

Elie Wiesel Museum Sighet

Elie Wiesel National Institute, Romania

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Januar 01, 2005

The Elie Wiesel National Institute for the Study of the Holocaust in Romania

Yearly commemorative ceremony

Yearly commemoration at the National Elie Wiesel Research Institute, Romania

In 2004, Romania took an essential step in the process of addressing its national history and dealing openly with its past: The International Committee for the Study of the Holocaust in Romania, chaired by Elie Wiesel, established the responsibility for the tragedy of Jews in Romania and the territories administrated by it. Following the committee’s recommendations, the Elie Wiesel Institute was founded in 2005. Its objectives are to encourage a Holocaust remembrance culture and prevent discrimination, xenophobia, and antisemitism. The research, cultural, and educational projects developed over time, independently or in partnership with national or international organizations, make this possible. The Research Department conducts projects concerning a broad range of subjects related to the Holocaust in Romania, aiming to deepen knowledge about it. Researchers can access on-site at the Elie Wiesel Institute the most important and complete archive containing official documents on the Holocaust in Romania, as well as a specialized library with academic literature on the topic. The remembrance of Holocaust victims, knowledge of the nation’s history, and the promotion of diversity and intercultural dialogue are the main objectives of the educational (training, workshops, seminars, conferences), cultural (exhibitions, film screenings), and commemorative activities developed by the institute.

Art exhibition at the National Elie Wiesel Research Institute, Romania

Art exhibition at the National Elie Wiesel Research Institute Romania

Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery, Russia

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Mai 05, 2014

Unveiling of the memorial plaque to the Jewish people at the Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery

Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery

View over the Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery

The Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery is the world’s largest cemetery dedicated to the victims of the Second World War. Of the nearly 500,000 people buried here, 70,000 were soldiers and 420,000 civilian victims. Since its inauguration on May 9, 1960, it is the official site for the performance of military honors granted to the victims of war. Before the Siege of Leningrad, there were approximately 180,000 Jews living in the city, amounting to 6% of the urban population. During the siege, Jews took part not only in battles to defend the city, but also in evacuation works, construction rebuilding for military needs, and camouflage works; Jews were builders, doctors, medical workers, teachers, photographers, employees of the Leningrad radiostation, museum workers, artists, theaterpeople, and musicians. 32,917 Jews are buried at the Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery, whereby this does not include those that served in the military. These figures are, however, incomplete: They were estimated based on the analysis of “Memory Books”; moreover, the burials were made disregarding the religion and nationality of the victims, which makes it even more difficult to accurately estimate the true number of Jews buried here. On May 5, 2014, the memorial plaque for the Jewish people was unveiled at the Memorial Cemetery. It’s inscription states: “To the sons and daughters of the Jewish people, defenders and victims of the Siege of Leningrad”

“To the sons and daughters of the Jewish people,defenders and victims of the Siege of Leningrad”

Memorial plaque

Boris Lurie Art Foundation, USA

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August 08, 2009

Mission of the Boris Lurie Art Foundation

Interview with Gertrude Stein

Interview with Gertrude Stein. Photographs for the project "AuschwitzandI" in New York, January 2020. Photo: Jürgen Kaumkötter.

The Boris Lurie Art Foundation is dedicated to reflect the life, work, and aspirations of the founder and to preserve and promote the NO!art movement with its focus on the social visionary in art and culture. Boris Lurie, a Holocaust survivor who emigrated to New York in 1946, was very active in the post-war New York avantgarde scene, founding the NO!art movement in 1959. The NO!Art movement calls for socially and politically involved art that resists and combats the repressive forces of the market. For the most part, critics and curators of the day rejected Lurie and NO!art, yet Lurie continued to produce his highly charged political and social imagery throughout his life. In recent years a reexamining of Lurie’s work has led to major museum exhibitions and new appreciation for the impact his work had on Post-War American Art.

Following Lurie’s death in 2008, the Foundation was established under the leadership of Gertrude Stein, Lurie’s gallerist and lifelong companion. The Foundation maintains the artist’s massive body of work, poetry, personal writings and archives, as well as the works of other NO!art artists which are under its control. Ms. Stein and the Foundation’s board honor the spirit of Mr. Lurie’s bequest by supporting avariety of initiatives, including public exhibitions, publications, films, acquisition, internships, and grants. Throught his range of activity the Boris Lurie Art Foundation believes it will make a material contribution to the artistic, social, and educational life of the community.

Boris-Lurie-Art-Foundation Photo: Jürgen Kaumkötter

Auschwitzundich project in New York January 2020

Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, USA

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Oktober 09, 1943

New York, March 9, 1943: "De Profundis. Cain, Where is Abel Thy Brother?" by Arthur Szyk

Arthur Szyk De Profundis Cain

B&W ink and graphite drawing of Christ in the midst of dying Jews with the Illunimated words “De Profundis -Cain, Where is Abel Thy Brother?" Signed and dated, lower right “Arthur Szyk. N.Y. 1943.

This important work represents Arthur Szyk's involvement in raising awareness in the United States of the Holocaust taking place in Europe. On March 9, 1943, the show "We Will Never Die," written by Ben Hecht, was performed in Madison Square Garden as part of a memorial pageant calling to rescue the Jews of Europe. Within the Latin title "De Profundis" (from the depths) in the top center of this work is a memento mori, an angel seated above a skeleton holding a scythe (reference to the grim reaper), and Job crying “Eli Eli” (my god, my god). The title is followed by the sub-title "Cain, where is Abel thy brother?" (Genesis 4:9) which references the Biblical story of the brothes Cain and Abel. After Cain killed his brother he is confronted by God saying that the blood of Abel cries to him from the ground (Genesis 4:10). There are two piles of Jewish people depicted; one in the foreground in which only a couple of the figures seem to be alive, and the second, in the background, next to the ruins of a house. At the back of the pile in the forefront supported by a damaged brick wall, is the Christian character of Jesus wearing a thorn crown and holding the tablets of stone with the ten commandments, to his left, is a religious Jewish man holding a decorated Torah scroll and next to it, a hand of one of the men is pointing at the sub-title.

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life was established in 2010 following the transfer of the Judah L. Magnes Museum to the University of California, Berkeley. Its remarkably diverse archive, library and museum holdings include art, objects, texts, music, and historical documents about the Jews in the Global Diaspora and the American West. As one of the world's preeminent Jewish collections in a university setting, it provides highly innovative and accessible resources to both researchers and the general public. The holdings of The Magnes continue to grow. In 2017, The Magnes established the Taube Family Arthur Szyk Collection, and in 2018 it received the gift of the Roman Vishniac Archive.

Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre, South Africa

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Januar 01, 2008

Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre (JHGC)

The permanent exhibition at the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre

The permanent exhibition at the Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre. © Anthea Pokroy.

The Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre (JHGC) is a place of memory, education and lessons for humanity. It explores the history of genocide in the 20th century with a focus on the case studies of the Holocaust and the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. It examines the connections between genocide and contemporary human rights issues, urging visitors to understand the consequences of prejudice, discrimination and 'othering', so as to prevent the recurrence of mass atrocities and genocide in all its forms. The Centre focuses on human rights issues such as prejudice, racism, ‘othering’, antisemitism, homophobia and xenophobia. Conscious of the dangers of indifference, apathy and silence, the JHGC urges its visitors to be an active voice against instances of hate speech and related human rights violations in their own communities. The JHGC was founded in 2008 and officially opened to the public in March 2019 as a public-private partnership with the City of Johannesburg. The JHGC, together with its sister Centres in Cape Town and Durban, forms part of the association, the South African Holocaust & Genocide Foundation. In 2007, the study of “Nazi Germany and the Holocaust” and “Ideas of Race in the 19th and 20th Centuries” was incorporated into the National High School Curriculum of South Africa for Grade 9 Social Sciences and Grade 11 History learners. The JHGC assists provincial education departments, schools and educators with these human rights modules by facilitating comprehensive and engaging educator training and learner workshops. The JHGC also hosts regular public events and programmes, including temporary exhibitions, lectures, filmscreenings, commemorations and other special workshops, which explore various topics related to genocide and humanrights. Through its “Change Makers Programme”, the JHGC also launched its education philosophy and resources in 12 countries in Africa.

The Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre. © Catherine Boyd

The Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre